Defense Issues

Military and general security

Posts Tagged ‘war’

Bicycle at war

Posted by picard578 on February 21, 2017

History

First bicycles (“Penny-Farthings”) were tall and dangerous to ride due to propensity for causing inadvertent sommersaults. These bikes were first tested in war by the French, used by dispatch riders and scouts during the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-1871, while Prussians still relied on push cycles. This conflict destroyed the French bicycle industry, and further advancement was left to United Kingdom and United States. It was English inventor John Kemp Starley who developed the “safety bicycle” by applying the invention of drive chain. In 1870. Italians introduced bicycle to their bersaglieri troops. Trained to carry dispatches, they averaged 12 miles an hour across open country. Read the rest of this entry »

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War Versus Direct Democracy

Posted by picard578 on November 8, 2016

United States are a feudal society. There is little social mobility. Rich families can afford to send their kids to private schools, while everybody else has to rely on underfunded, low-quality public schools. This means that even people who may have the ability to do something, to climb social ladder, do not get to do so because they do not get the education. Starting conditions are inequal, and rich get all the advantages. This leads to social stratification and setup not dissimilar to social classes of feudalism – peasant could and can become a noble, but it happens extremely rarely. And because of this stratification, it is impossible for democracy to develop and function. Bush and Clinton dynasties are just some of the dynastic families that have huge influence in US economy and politics – Samuel Prescott Bush established the family fortune in 1908, and the family became politically prominent in 1918. His son, Prescott Sheldon Bush, was a friend of Nelson Rockefeller and financed Adolph Hitler. The Mellon family an Irish immigrant family from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, are known for the Bank of New York Mellon, Chevron, Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA), and New York Shipbuilding, among a number of other companies. The Murdoch family are media moguls, starting from early 1900s. The Rockefellers are a banking and industry superpower from 1870, when John D. Rockefeller founded Standard Oil. The Koch family are another oil-based dynasty, but with a shorter history, starting in early-to-mid 20th century. The Sulzberger family controls The New York Times at least since mid-1900s. The Kennedy family has been in US politics since late 1900s. These are just the most prominent examples, but such social immobility is normal for the US society as a whole, because rich get all the advantages in the start. It is these families that started the Iraqi War, which in turn indirectly caused the ongoing islamic invasion of Europe. Why? Because they – all of them – own businesses (oil and weapons) which directly profited from the war. Thus conspiracies are born, since the very rich elite comprised of very few people has both the ability and the opportunity to conspire behind the backs of the publica, and Res Publici thus becomes Res Secreti.

Patrice Ayme's Thoughts

When We The People decide to go to war, it can be an excellent thing; to wit, many a revolution, including those which gave rise to the USA, the French Republic, the Republic of China (OK, OK… There were two…). However, when an oligarchy, or a plutocracy, decides to go to war, it is rarely a good thing. Most often, it is an atrocious thing. The war the USA launched in Mesopotamia, as one of its principals, if not the principal actor, one way or another, has not been a good thing for the Middle-East (although, lo and behold, it has been an excellent thing for the domestic oil industry of the USA. Any rapprochement between these facts is sheer coincidence, and no animals were hurt during the making of this movie).

So the so-called “Islamist State” captured Ramadi, a large city just west of Baghdad. The next day, it…

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Rounding Up The Chicoms

Posted by picard578 on August 10, 2016

Rounding Up The Chicoms by David Archibald, author of Australia’s Defence (Connor Court) and Twilight of Abundance (Regnery) 2 August 2016   We study history so as to not repeat it. If your ad…

Source: Rounding Up The Chicoms

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Notes on War

Posted by picard578 on January 15, 2015

War is not a question of mathematics

While mathematic considerations such as numbers, range, firepower and armor are important, they are not the decisive factor. War in itself tends to be confusing, and especially in maneuver warfare, side that acts faster and more appropriately is more likely to win. For this reason, personal factors such as training, personal initiative, communications and situational awareness outweight arithmetical factors such as weapons quality (as commonly understood in numerical terms) and quantity by a large degree.

Training is by far the most important factor since it allows troops to quickly adapt and outmaneuver the enemy. Again, amount of training does not tell much if we don’t know how it is done. Advantage in training can easily neutralize disadvantages in technical and personal areas such as situational awareness or deficient weapons. Read the rest of this entry »

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