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Posts Tagged ‘mobilization’

Military recruitment and service model

Posted by picard578 on March 31, 2019

Military training is mandatory for all able-bodied individuals – or individuals who can be made able-bodied. Preparatory training starts in the elementary school. Recruitment age is 18 years old as standard, with minimum of 16 years and maximum of 40 years of age, but longer service is not unknown. Draft is carried out at 18 years of age, though it may be done earlier or later based on circumstances. Draft may be deferred for a maximum of two years due to high school education, or else carried out early in case of early end of education. After being drafted, soldier undergoes one to two years of training (1 year basic + 1 year specialist/officer). Under normal conditions only a portion of recruits proceed to active service while the remainder are sent straight into Reserves. Normal service time in standing military is 4 years with additional 28 years in reserves, or else 32 years in reserves (numbers include training). After two-year active service, contract can be renewed for four years, and every four years afterwards. If contract is not renewed, person is transferred to reserves. This makes immediate expansion of an active force a simple matter of contract renewal; or non-renewal, if it is to be reduced. Alternative possibility for expansion, used when there is greater lead-up to crisis (e.g. a war that had been incoming for a time), is to simply increase the number of conscripts retained.

Reserve consists of three primary categories. These are Regular Ready Reserve (units maintained at full strength), Partial Ready Reserve (units maintained at 15% strength but full staff, allowing for quick mobilization) and Individual Ready Reserve (reservists not assigned to any units). Members of RRR and PRR perform reserve duty on a monthly basis with their units. IRR members are subject to call-ups at various times, and are used to fill out understrength units in case of mobilization. All soldiers have to register their place of stay with the military commissariat.

Partial Ready Reserve, or the “Cadre Army”, is staffed with commanders, their staffs, and minimum necessary conscripts to perform various maintenance and other jobs. As noted, such units are maintained at 15% strength, but can expand to full strength in matter of weeks. These units deploy to training areas in full strength every year, and also conduct multiple-area training every five years.

Individual Ready Reserve consists of all able-bodied men of 18 and over that are not assigned to other military formations. IRRs primary purposes are to act as a pool of trained personnel for the active and reserve military units, and also to enable guerilla-style resistance in occupied territory. Territorial defense would focus on defending local defense production, enabling regular units to focus on other areas.

Military Commissariat forms councils of local officers of a military district. This council meets at regular intervals to resolve problems, arbitrate in draft deferment requests, discuss the implementation of policy, calculate and register human and other resources of interest, oversee preparation of youth for carrying out military service, conduct call-ups for military service and training assemblies, carrying out general defensive measures, selecting and nominating candidates for military schools. It also maintains a list of all service-age adults, including current place of living.

During peacetime, Regular Ready Reserve divisions are maintained in three categories. Category I divisions are combat ready, with 75 – 100% of their full wartime strength. Category II divisions are at 50 – 75% of their wartime strength, and Category III at less than 50%. Reserve officers are a mix of former active duty officers, men specifically educated for the job while at training, and warrant officers with at least five years’ experience.

Reservists themselves are divided into categories. Category I reservists are those fresh from training or active service, and they stock Category I divisions, as well as elements of Category II divisions. They serve 1 night a week, 1 weekend a month, 2 weeks a year (90 days/nights total). After four years, they are downgraded to Category II unless they volunteer and meet requirements for remaining in Category I. These drill once a year for four weeks, and staff Category II and III divisions. After additional four years, they are downgraded to Category III, and staff only Category III divisions. They drill when division requires personnel. If a reservist wishes to remain in higher category (for benefits or else), he may do so if he passes physical and mental testing.

Refresher training is carried out for reservists every year for two weeks, as well as two days each month. In increased peacetime readiness level, refresher training may be increased to two weeks every six or three months, and two days each fifteen or seven days.

Newly trained officers are placed under mentorship of more experienced officers, and in unit are assisted, advised and educated by experienced NCOs. Officers from lieutenant level up have to have finished education courses in history, geography, culture, diplomacy and technology. During peacetime, performance assessment and thus promotion is carried out through force-on-force exercises (colloquially known as “playing tag” due to low-power training weapons being used). Leave is granted on a rotational basis for a period of 30 to 90 days. All soldiers receive service pay and pension upon leaving the service. Retirement is accepted after finishing the term of service, but earlier discharge may be granted for medicinal reasons. Soldiers discharged for medical reasons may be accepted back in service only after a thorough medical examination, and are also regularly monitored for time after reentry. Soldiers discharged due to wounds taken on the battlefield are given tax reduction.

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