Defense Issues

Military and general security

  • Follow Defense Issues on WordPress.com
  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 272 other followers

  • September 2020
    M T W T F S S
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    282930  
  • Categories

Posts Tagged ‘Defense Budget tutorial’

Defense Budget Tutorial #3C Pork How to Get Rid of It

Posted by picard578 on September 14, 2013

Defense Budget Tutorial #3C: Pork: How to Get Rid of It

February 6, 2006
Winslow Wheeler / Straus Military Reform Project / Center for Defense Information

Pork’s most prominent characteristics are its unknown cost and value to US national defense, and the fact that there is no effort in Congress to ensure due diligence in providing the goods or services in question. This essay spells out a “simple but difficult” five-point plan to rein in military pork.

http://www.cdi.org/friendlyversion/printversion.cfm?documentID=3289&from_page=../program/document.cfm

(February 1, 2006) — To eliminate pork, one must first understand what it is. As discussed in “Defense Budget Tutorial #3B: Pork: What is it?,” pork’s most prominent characteristics are its unknown cost and value to US national defense, and the fact that there is no effort in Congress to ensure due diligence in providing the goods or services in question. [1] Pork is acquired through an opaque process that seeks to operate in the shadows of government with as little explanation and evaluation as possible to ensure that the intended recipient gets the goodies. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Defense Budget Tutorial #3B: Pork: What is it?

Posted by picard578 on August 3, 2013

Defense Budget Tutorial #3B: Pork: What is it?

By Winslow Wheeler

January 31, 2006

It’s not what you think

Going through the lists of pork in defense appropriations bills, it is quite easy to pick examples that appear foolish on their own face or that obviously have no proper place in the defense budget: museums, bicentennial Lewis and Clark celebrations, and breast and prostate cancer research are typical examples. However, such items that appear to be both defense-related and even useful also occur. Surely, soldiers in the mountains of Afghanistan have a need for the “fleece insulated liners” identified in an earlier tutorial (#3A: “Pork: Where is it?”). Just as clearly, the $1.7 million addition for a “Program Increase” for the “Joint Stand-Off Weapon” (page 282) may be justifiable, as perhaps is an additional $5.5 million for the “Walter Reed Amputee Center.”

Is the latter pork?

Of course, it is. The real problem is that nobody knows the real merit of these and other earmarks, even when they have relevant and useful sounding names. For example, Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

CDI: Defense Budget Tutorial #3A: Pork: Where is it?

Posted by picard578 on July 13, 2013

http://www.d-n-i.net/fcs/defense_budget_tutorial_3a.htm

January 30, 2006

Winslow Wheeler

Winslow Wheeler is Director of the Straus Military Reform Project at the Center for Defense Information and the author of The Wastrels of Defense. This is the first of a series of three “Defense Budget Tutorials” on pork (earmarking) in defense legislation.

Not Hard to Find

With 2,966 examples costing about $11.1 billion, [2] the pork in the 2006 Department of Defense Appropriations Bill, now law, is not hard to find. There are examples in almost every “title” of the bill, including parts most would probably hope to be pork-free.

For example, the Military Personnel Title, which funds military pay and benefits, is burdened with $1.6 million for “Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Activities” to pay for members of Congress to invite “up to 10 students from each state and territory” to participate in a “Youth Rendezvous” in some lucky congressional district. [3]

Nor do past embarrassments seem to have slowed the process. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: