Proposal for Army armoured vehicles

Introduction

Modern militaries have various types of vehicles for various jobs. These range from destruction of hard targets (tanks and bunkers) to convoy escort, peacekeeping and counterinsurgency. For this reason, and due to variance in terrains as well, most if not all types need to exist in more than one category. Main battle tanks can take considerable punishment, but are vulnerable to infantry and air support, and are impotent in very difficult terrains. They are also lacking in strategic and operational mobility, being incapable of utilizing many bridges. On the other hand, lighter forces often lack the direct fire support on the same level as main battle tanks provide, so they need lighter systems with similar firepower.

General features

All vehicles should have a water boiler to allow reheating MREs or brewing up. They should also have some form of electronic IFF to reduce fratricide from close air support (especially problematic with the fast jets). At least light vehicles should be amphibious without preparation, and medium and heavy vehicles should be capable of utilizing snorkel, so as to eliminate the need for bridges. All vehicles should have protection from anti-tank mines and IEDs provided by a combination of a v-hull and a composite armor. All combat vehicles should also have some form of bow armament, e.g. driver’s machine gun in a tank, in addition to turreted armament typically carried. Personnel carriers should have firing ports provided for the troops being carried, since suppressive fire is a better defence from RPG armed ambushiers than passive armour. Machine guns should be directly manned for situational awareness and equipped with gun shields. All armoured vehicles should have smoke grenade launchers to provide smoke screens when necessary as well as dozer blades to self dig-in when necessary (these can also be used for barricade removal). Tracked vehicles should have rubber band inserts to prevent tracks from wearing from road usage. All vehicles should be designed from the outset to receive additional bolted-on armour, should their crews determine existing armour to be insufficient, which means that the drive system should be able to tolerate at least 10% weight increase above standard combat weight. Closed-box armoured vehicles (tanks, APCs etc.) should also be capable of traversing rivers up to 5 meters deep by fording.

All vehicles should have emblems of light-reflective materials rather than just being painted, and a white spotlight should be fitted to each emblem for night operations. Emblems should also be visible by night vision equipment. They should be constructed like a shuttered window, so the emblem can be concealed when camouflage requires this. This is especially true for medical vehicles, which in many cases are high-value targets (for terrorists, e.g.). Similar emblems on top of the vehicle can be used to identify themselves to close air support aircraft.

Combat vehicles

Heavy tank

This tank will be in 70 ton class, with either 120 mm L55 gun or 130 mm L51 gun. Aside from the normal HE, HEAT, APFSDS and similar rounds, it will also carry a complement of rocket-propelled anti-tank rounds (gun-launched missiles, possibly LAHAT), with a total of 50 120 mm rounds or 42 130 mm rounds. Usage of modular armor will allow repairs in the field. Active protection system will also be implemented. Engine will be Europack MT 883 with 1.215 kW, giving a power-to-weight ratio of 17,35 kW/t. It should have coaxial 12,7 mm machine gun, and top-mounted 12,7 and 7,62 mm machine guns with shields. Loader’s station machine gun could also be replaced with a grenade launcher. Top speed should be 55-60 kph on road and 35-40 kph cross-country.

Medium tank

This tank will be in 45 ton class, with 120 mm L45 gun. Ammunition carried will be the same as for the heavy tank, but a total of 42 rounds will be carried. Protection will be based around modular armor and active protection systems. Engine is identical to that of a heavy tank, giving power-to-weight ratio of 27,0 kW/t. It should have coaxial 12,7 mm machine gun, and top-mounted 12,7 and 7,62 mm machine guns with shields. Loader’s station machine gun could also be replaced with a grenade launcher. Top speed should be 72 kph on road and 55 kph cross country, though speeds upwards of 80 kph could be achievable on the road.

Light tank

This tank will be in 20-25 ton class, with 105 or 120 mm L40 gun. Due to greater emphasis on infantry support, proportion of HE ammunition will be increased relative to either HEAT or APFSDS ammunition. Main protection will be via active protection system. Engine should provide power-to-weight ratio of 25,0 kW/t, leading to a requirement for a 500 kW engine. It should be deployable via parachute so that airborne troops have armored support instead of relying on air support from fast jets which specializes in murdering civilians. It would also allow engagement of enemies in covered positions such as machine gun bunkers. It should have coaxial 12,7 mm machine gun, and top-mounted 12,7 and 7,62 mm machine guns with shields. Loader’s station machine gun could also be replaced with a grenade launcher. A version with a short-barreled 120 mm gun should also be available for usage in the areas where long barrel could cause problems (e.g. forrests). Top speed should be 75 kph on road and 55 kph cross-country, though speeds of 80-100 kph may be achievable on road.

Heavy assault gun

This vehicle will be based on the heavy tank chassis, but with a turretless gun. Gun utilized should be either the same as on the heavy tank for tank destroyer work, or lower-velocity higher calibre gun (155 mm) for the demolition / infantry support work. Large proportion of the rounds should be HESH-P, effective in both antitank and anti-bunker role. It should also have a provision for gun to be loaded via hatch when operating in indirect fire role so that the onboard ammunition can be preserved. It will have active protection systems. Weight should be in 70 ton class, with weight savings from the turret removal being moved to additional armor.

Light assault gun

This vehicle will be based on the light tank chassis, but with a turretless gun. Gun utilized should be either the same as on the medium tank for tank destroyer work, or lower-velocity higher calibre gun for the demolition / infantry support work. It should also have a provision for gun to be loaded via hatch when operating in indirect fire role so that the onboard ammunition can be preserved. It will have active protection systems. Weight should be in 20 ton class, with weight savings from the turret removal being moved to additional armor. It should be deployable via parachute for the same reasons as the light tank.

Heavy tracked APC

This vehicle will be based on the heavy tank chassis, but with the engine moved in front of the driver to allow additional protection for the driver, and to allow installation of rear doors for troop deployment. It will utilize remote control weapons station with either a 12,7 mm machine gun or a grenade launcher, a 7,62 mm machine gun, and a mortar. It will have 360* situational awareness through cameras. It will also employ active protection system. Weight should be in 70 ton class, with weight savings from the turret and gun removal being moved to additional armor. Capacity should be 12-14 troops.

An IFV variant should have light 30 mm autocannon, machine guns, anti-tank missiles and a pod of unguided rockets. Autocannon should have rounds with programmable priming in addition to standard selection of rounds, as well as mortar shells for high trajectory shots. Coaxial machine gun could be either 7,62 or 12,7 mm callibre. Rockets should be based on 2,75” FFAR with capability against personnel and helicopters. It would also have two ATGW tubes which should also double as recoilless rifles for demolition work. These should have modular mounting, and be replacable with SAMs, miniguns or flamethrowers.

Medium tracked APC

This vehicle will be based on the medium tank chassis, but with the engine moved in front of the driver to allow additional protection for the driver, and to allow installation of rear doors for troop deployment. It will utilize remote control weapons station with either a 12,7 mm machine gun or a grenade launcher, a 7,62 mm machine gun, and a mortar. It will have 360* situational awareness through cameras. It will also employ active protection system. Weight should be in 45 ton class, with weight savings from the turret and gun removal being moved to additional armor. Capacity should be 12-14 troops.

An IFV variant should have light 30 mm autocannon, machine guns, anti-tank missiles and a pod of unguided rockets. Autocannon should have rounds with programmable priming in addition to standard selection of rounds, as well as mortar shells for high trajectory shots.

Light tracked APC

This vehicle will be based on the light tank chassis. Engine will be in front of the driver, and turret will be replaced by a remote weapons station utilizing a 12,7 mm machine gun, a grenade launcher or a 20 mm autocannon. Secondary directly manned station will employ either 7,62 or 12,7 machine gun, a grenade launcher or a recoilless rifle. A variant with 155 mm mortar should also be utilized. It will have 360* situational awareness and active protection system. Weight should be in 20 ton class. Capacity should be 10-12 troops, likely less in variants utilizing high calibre support weapons.

An IFV variant should have light 30 mm autocannon, machine guns, anti-tank missiles and a pod of unguided rockets. Autocannon should have rounds with programmable priming in addition to standard selection of rounds, as well as mortar shells for high trajectory shots.

Light wheeled APC

Wheeled APC will have an 8×8 configuration with full tires. Armament will be one of the following: a 12,7 machine gun, a grenade launcher, a recoilless rifle or a remote weapons stations with same options as light tracked APC. It will have 360* situational awareness and active protection system. Weight should be in 10 ton class. Top speed should be 100 kph on land or 10 kph in water, if amphibious capability can be achieved without utilizing aluminum “armour”. Capacity should be 10-12 troops.

Light tracked APC – tank destroyer variant

This vehicle will be based on the light tank chassis. Turret will be replaced by a remote weapons station / unmanned turret utilizing either the same gun as a heavy tank, or antitank missiles with visual or IR guidance. Missiles could be combined with a 30 mm autocannon. It will have 360* situational awareness and active protection system. Weight should be in 25 ton class.

Light wheeled APC – tank destroyer variant

This will be based on wheeled APC chassis. Turret will be replaced by a remote weapons station / unmanned turret utilizing either the same gun as a heavy tank, or antitank missiles with visual or IR guidance. Missiles could be combined with a 30 mm autocannon. It will have 360* situational awareness and active protection system. Weight should be in 15 ton class.

Air defense vehicle

This vehicle will be based on the tank chassis. Standard turret will be replaced by a turret equipped with one of the following: a 30 mm Gattling air defense gun, a dual 30 mm revolver air defense gun, a 57 mm linear acton or revolver air defense gun, short-range or medium-range SAMs. It should also have an X-band radar dish and/or dual band shortwave-midwave IRST. Variant equipped with air defense gun could also be utilized for missile defense, shooting down enemy air-to-ground and ground-to-ground missiles in a manner similar to shipboard CIWS. High elevation of gun will also make it useful in urban operations and other situations where targets could be found on high elevations. Vehicle should be deployed in three variants, based on the heavy, medium and light tank chassis, respectively.

Flamethrower tank

This vehicle will be based on tank chassis. This configuration would have a flamethrower but also retain the main gun as flamethrower would be mounted in the body of a tank. Fuel for the flamethrower would be towed in a separate jettisonable trailer, so that it would be able to continue in standard tank role once flamethrower fuel is spent, and crew would be protected if the fuel caught fire. Main gun would also have a selection of thermobaric projectiles. It will be deployed in heavy, medium and light variants.

155 mm mortar carrier

This vehicle will be essentially the same as the medium tank, but main gun will be replaced by a 155 mm breech-loading mortar. Main round will be thin walled high capacity HE or HESH shell to serve as anti-infantry and demolition weapon. It should also have smoke shells for providing smoke cover, as well as thermobaric shells.

120 mm mortar carrier

This vehicle will be essentially the same as the medium tank, but main gun will be replaced by a 120 mm breech-loading mortar. Main round will be thin walled high capacity HE or HESH shell to serve as anti-infantry and demolition weapon. It should also have smoke shells for providing smoke cover, as well as thermobaric shells.

81 mm mortar carrier

This vehicle will be designed as an open-roof version of a light APC, deployed in both tracked and wheeled variants. It will carry 81 mm infantry mortar, which will be removable in the case that vehicle is disabled or mortar section has to dismount for some other reason (e.g. impassable terrain). Lower calibre also means shorter minimum range, making it more suitable for company support operations. If necessary, 81 mm mortar could also be replaced by other calibres of mortars, such as 155 mm, 120 mm or 60 mm.

Heavy self-propelled howitzer

This vehicle will utilize a turretless design with a howitzer mounted on the body of either a medium or a heavy tank. Ammunition will be transported by a separate vehicle, with 2-8 rounds being carried in external containers hanged onto howitzer’s sides. Howitzer should come in calibres of 105 mm, 155 mm, 203 mm and 254 mm. It should utilize both classic and rocket-propelled shells.

Medium self-propelled howitzer

This vehicle will be of an armored, turreted design with a howitzer mounted on the body of a medium tank. Armour should be resistant to 14,5 mm ammunition, with total weight of no more than 50 tons. Howitzer should come in calibres of 105 mm L70 and 155 mm L52. It should utilize both classic and rocket-propelled shells. Hatch should be provided for reloading so that onboard ammunition reserves can be preserved.

Light self-propelled howitzer

Light SP howitzer will utilize open-topped tank or APC hull; a truck variant might also be possible. It will carry a fully functional field howitzer, which will allow howitzer to be removed and utilized as classical field artillery in the case that carriage is damaged. Carriage itself should come in wheeled and tracked version, to better exploit advantages of both configurations. Howitzer should come in calibres of 75 mm, 95 mm, 105 mm and 155 mm, and utilize both classical and rocket-propelled shells.

Heavy Multiple Launch Rocket System

This system will combine body of a heavy truck with multiple-barreled rocket launcher; truck should have armoured protection sufficient to stop at least 12,7 mm calibre ammunition. These vehicles should accompany other self-propelled artillery units to allow it to achieve rapid high volume fire when needed, and also to destroy enemy area fortifications. Some would be under direct divisional command. Rockets should come in 152 mm, 203 mm, 254 mm, 305 mm, 356 mm and 381 mm calibre. They should have high-explosive, armor-piercing, white phosphorus, thermobaric, illumination and smoke rocket options.

Armoured Multiple Launch Rocket System

This system will combine body of a medium tank with multiple-barreled rocket launcher. These vehicles should accompany other self-propelled artillery units to allow it to achieve rapid high volume fire when needed. Rockets should come in 60 mm, 90 mm, 122 mm, 152 mm, 203 mm and 254 mm calibre. They should have high-explosive, armor-piercing, white phosphorus, thermobaric, illumination and smoke rocket options.

Medium Multiple Launch Rocket System

This system will combine truck body with multiple-barreled rocket launcher. These vehicles should accompany other self-propelled artillery units to allow it to achieve rapid high volume fire when needed. Rockets should come in 60 mm, 90 mm, 122 mm, 152 mm and 203 mm calibre. They should have high-explosive, armor-piercing, white phosphorus, thermobaric, illumination and smoke rocket options.

Light Multiple Launch Rocket System

This system will combine jeep (HMMWV) body with either single or multiple barreled rocket launcher. These vehicles should be assigned to light scout or infantry regiments to provide fast and mobile artillery support. Rockets should come in 60 mm, 90 mm and 122 mm calibre. They should have high-explosive, armor-piercing, white phosphorus, thermobaric, illumination and smoke rocket options. Vehicle should be protected from infantry weapons up to and including .50 calibre as well as mines, and should be capable of operation without operators having to leave the cabin.

Armoured car

Armoured car should be fully enclosed and armoured wheeled vehicle with a hatch on the top. It would have a .50 calibre machine gun and smoke grenade launchers, as well as gun ports for the crew. For purposes of usage in constricted urban areas in counterinsurgency operations, it would have two drivers – in front and in back – so it would be able to drive in either direction without turning around. Protection should be provided against the mines and infantry weapons, with in-built provisions for modular and improvised armour as necessary.

HMMWV

Hummers should be equipped with light composite armour and anti-mine protection. For armament, they should have a selection of .50 BGMs or recoilless rifles. Both of these should come with optical sights optional to provide counter-sniper fire and, in latter case, counter-armour capability.

Gun truck

Gun truck would be based on a general-purpose truck (described in the support vehicles section), but with the container replaced by an open-top unit with armoured sides for better situational awareness. Armament options should include general-purpose machine gun, 12,7 mm heavy machine gun, 20-40 mm autocannon or anti-aircraft gun, automatic grenade launcher, mortar, IR MANPADS or any other weapons which might be necessary. All weapons, if at all possible, should be removable so that they can be utilized by dismounted infantry if truck is disabled or destroyed. Primary purpose of gun truck is convoy escort during counterinsurgency operations, with open roof allowing weapons with high elevation (such as anti-aircraft guns) to fire at high-positioned insurgents. Due to lack of protection, all weapons should be equipped with gun shields.

Combat support vehicles

Reconnaissance vehicle

This vehicle will be based on a light APC chassis (both tracked and wheeled variants), but turret will be equipped with various sensory systems. APC’s troop compartment will be utilized as a center for drone operator, as well as a storage for two to three light portable drones. Each vehicle would be supported by bike or motorbike mounted scouts, as a man with a radio and binoculars is in many cases better choice than a UAV and especialy an APC. It would also have direct uplink to commander of the unit it is assigned to, making sure that information reaches him in time instead of uploading information to sluggish and unreliable centralized management which cannot disseminate proper information to proper units in time.

Counterbattery radar – heavy

This vehicle should use the body of a heavy tracked APC. It should be an S-band radar with at least 90 degree coverage in both azimuth and elevation. After detecting a projectile and extrapolating its point of origin from the track sequence, data should be automatically datalinked to mobile artillery systems of a unit that radar is assigned to. Upon doing this, radar should switch to friendly fire mode to determine the accuracy of counterbattery fire. Range should be 50 kilometers or greater.

Counterbattery radar – light

This vehicle should use the body of a light truck. It should be an S-band radar with at least 90 degree coverage in both azimuth and elevation. After detecting a projectile and extrapolating its point of origin from the track sequence, data should be automatically datalinked to mobile artillery systems of a unit that radar is assigned to. Upon doing this, radar should switch to friendly fire mode to determine the accuracy of counterbattery fire. Range should be 50 kilometers.

Support vehicles

Ammunition transport vehicle

This vehicle should be designed in the same way as tracked APC, but with modifications to allow easier transport and handling of ammunitions. This should allow it to follow armoured divisions and resupply them even in combat zones. It should have light weapons to supress the infantry, which would be especially important when escorting assault guns. This vehicle should be deployed in three weight classes, based on heavy, medium and light tanks.

Armoured fuel tanker

This vehicle should be designed in the same way as tracked APC, but instead of troop compartment it will have a fuel tank with extendable armored line. This should allow it to follow armoured divisions and refuel them even in combat zones, thus avoiding problems as faced by the US tank units as they pushed into Baghdad in 2003. Refuelling could be done via remotely controlled telescope probe so as to avoid having crews leave their vehicles during the process. It should be deployed in heavy, medium and light variants.

Light version will have superior mobility, allowing it to follow light armour even to areas where wheeled vehicles, heavy tracked vehicles and aircraft would be unable to go, thus ensuring resupply even in unfavourable conditions.

Firefighting vehicle

This vehicle will be essentially the same as the tank, but main gun will be replaced by a firefighting device. This will allow extinguishing any vehicles that catch fire (as M1 Abrams is prone to if struck by an RPG into vulnerable rear grill area). Having such a vehicle will prevent having troops to come out of their vehicle(s) to use handheld extinguishers. This vehicle should also have a dozer blade to smother fires with dirt. This vehicle should be deployed in three weight classes, based on heavy, medium and light tanks.

Armed combat engineering vehicle

This vehicle will have variants based on heavy and medium tank chassis. Main armament would be Royal Ordinance L9 165 mm short-barrelled demolition gun utilizing HEP (high explosive, plastic) ammunition; depending on the variant, loadout will be either 40 or 30 rounds of ammunition. It would also have coaxial 7,62 mm, driver’s 7,62 mm and commander’s 12,7 mm machine gun. Equipment will include either a dozer blade or a mine rake.

Combat engineering vehicle

This vehicle will be based on heavy and medium tank chassis. It will be unarmed, with equipment consisting of a large excavator arm, and either anti-mine plough or a bulldozer blade on the front. For mine clearing purposes, it will tow a Python trailer.

Armoured recovery vehicle

This vehicle will have variants based on the heavy and medium tank chassis. It should have a main winch which should allow it 98 ton(ne)-force pull in 2:1 configuration, a crane capable of lifting 1.800 kg (EuroPack Mt 883 diesel engine weight) at distance of 5 meters, a detachable trailer capable of carrying engines of all vehicles listed in this article, a dozer blade for obstacle clearance and fire position preparation, and a set of recovery and heavy repair tools.

Medevac vehicle

This vehicle should be an armoured personnell carrier modified for the medical use (terrorists do not respect Geneva conventions). The Red Cross should have a shuttered window construction, so it can be concealed for the purposes of camouflage. Variants based on light, medium and heavy APC should be available. It will be optionally armed for use in areas where Geneva conventions are not respected (such as the Middle East).

Armoured bridge carrier

Armoured bridge carrier should be based on the tank chassis and thus come in three variants (heavy, medium, light). It will carry a quickly-deployable bridge for purposes of crossing narrow waterways and chasms, with 26 meters in length. Such bridge carriers could also be adapted to carry and deploy pontoon bridge elements when larger bodies of water have to be crossed.

Armoured amphibious rig

Amphibious rig will be wheeled or tracked truck with only light armour in order to achieve amphibious capabilities. It will carry two large aluminum pontoons, deployed along the length of the hull, and will be steered by pump jets. Each truck will carry four ramps by which they can be connected to each other and to the shore. They will also be capable of acting as a ferry to bridge gaps that would be unpractical to form a bridge across.

Armoured ladder carrier

Armoured ladder carrier will be based on a light tank chassis and carry a ladder with ventral and side armour. It would used in street fighting to access the higher levels of buildings through windows or shell holes.

Armoured water cannon vehicle

This vehicle will be based on a wheeled or tracked truck chassis. It will be used to put out unwanted fires during MOUT as well as for riot control (and peacetime firefighting if necessary). Armoured protection should be sufficient to protect against direct 12,7 mm hits, as well as having mine blast and IED protection. Water cannons could also be replaced by flamethrowers for combat purposes.

Armoured general-purpose truck

This vehicle should come in wheeled, half-track and tracked configuration. Having armoured truck would reduce vulnerability of logistical chain as well as light infantry. High priority should be given to mine and IED protection, including the V-shaped bottom and light composite armour. Cargo compartment should be modular, allowing it multiple options, such as towing a flatbed for tanks, mounting its own flatbed or a protected cargo container. It should be capable of carrying Pillow tanks, palletes and other cargo such as ammunition.

A special type of protected container, Infantry Carrying Container, would allow it to perform as a low-cost infantry carrier, suitable for escorting other trucks, as well as other tasks as necessary. ICC would have armour, firing ports and seating for at least a squad. All sides of a container should be provided with escape hatches. It should also mount manned or remotely controlled weapons such as machine guns or automatic grenade launchers; dorsal turret would also have options for light cannon and rocket packs. Roof should be removable so as to allow mortar fire from within the container. An ICC could also be used as a pre-fab basis for static positions or mobile military bases.

Ammunition trailer

A lightly armoured trailer should be provided for tanks to tow with them. This will allow them to carry significantly greater supply of small-arms ammunition when necessary; even if it were to cook off, it would not be a danger to a bottled-up tank. Tanks will thus reduce reliance on relatively vulnerable logistical train when operating in urban areas; fuel meanwhile can be gotten from city’s own supplies. What resupply needs to take place can be done with armored resupply vehicles described above.

Armoured bulldozer

Unlike combat engineering vehicle, this will be a purpose-designed bulldozer. It will be based on the Caterpillar D9 bulldozer, but equipped with cabin and engine armour, bulletproof glass, slat armour, crew machine guns, smoke projectors and grenade launchers. It should also have extensive anti-mine protection and armoured dozer blade.

Combat engineer tractor

C.E.T. would be a lightly armoured amphibious vehicle. Its tasks would be preparation for bridge construction, digging vehicle pits, constructing barriers, repairing roads, recovering disabled vehicles (especially from water), preparing riverbanks for vehicle crossings and clearing obstacles. It should have an anchor, an earthmoving bucket and a winch rope. Top speed should be ~55 kph on road, and 8-10 kph in water.

Further reading

http://www.mtu-online.com/mtu/applications/land-defense/mtu-system-solutions-mtu-powerpackr-mtu-europowerpack/

Final list of vehicle and undercarriage types

Vehicles:
Combat:
1) Heavy tank
2) Medium tank
3) Light tank
4) Heavy assault gun
5) Light assault gun
6) Heavy tracked APC
7) Medium tracked APC
8) Light tracked APC
9) Light wheeled APC
10) Light tracked tank destroyer
11) Light wheeled tank destroyer
12) Heavy air defense vehicle
13) Medium air defense vehicle
14) Light air defense vehicle
15) Heavy flamethrower vehicle
16) Medium flamethrower vehicle
17) Light flamethrower vehicle
18) 155 mm mortar carrier
19) 120 mm mortar carrier
20) 81 mm mortar carrier
21) Heavy self-propelled howitzer
22) Medium self-propelled howitzer
23) Light self-propelled howitzer
24) Heavy MLRS
25) Armoured MLRS
26) Medium MLRS
27) Light MLRS
28) Armoured car
29) HMMW
30) Gun truck
Combat support:
31) Tracked reconaissance vehicle
32) Wheeled reconnaissance vehicle
33) Heavy counterbattery radar
34) Light counterbattery radar
Support:
35) Heavy ammunition transport vehicle
36) Medium ammunition transport vehicle
37) Light ammunition transport vehicle
38) Heavy fuel tanker
39) Medium fuel tanker
40) Light fuel tanker
41) Heavy firefighting vehicle
42) Medium firefighting vehicle
43) Light firefighting vehicle
44) Heavy armed combat engineering vehicle
45) Medium armed combat engineering vehicle
46) Heavy combat engineering vehicle
47) Medium combat engineering vehicle
48) Heavy armoured recovery vehicle
49) Medium armoured recovery vehicle
50) Heavy medevac vehicle
51) Medium medevac vehicle
52) Light medevac vehicle
53) Heavy bridge carrier
54) Medium bridge carrier
55) Light bridge carrier
56) Armoured amphibious rig
57) Armoured ladder carrier
58) Armoured water cannon vehicle
59) Armoured general-purpose truck
60) Armoured bulldozer
61) Combat engineer tractor

Undercarriages:
1) Heavy tank
2) Medium tank
3) Light tank
4) Light wheeled APC
5) Heavy truck
6) Heavy truck (tracked)
7) Light truck
8) Light truck (tracked)
9) HMMWV
10) Armoured car
11) Armoured amphibious rig
12) Armoured bulldozer
13) Combat engineering tractor

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Categories: proposals

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14 replies

  1. I will be going live with my Light Tank proposal shortly.

  2. Very Intresting article, I have tons of comments and insights about the contents, Iéll be sure to read it point by point and give my opinion on each 🙂

  3. Pretty extensive list.

    What do you think about artillery?

    – Towed 155mm howitzer
    – May want to consider a towed 130mm gun (same gun as the anti-tank that already exists); the Russians use towed 125mm anti-tank guns
    – Towed rocket artillery

    Do you think a 203mm gun is needed? It may worth looking into a modern equal to this (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/203_mm_howitzer_M1931_%28B-4%29 ), although perhaps with a longer barrel (perhaps even as long as 55 calibres).

    For the light MLRS, it may be worth looking into just using something like the BM21 Grad, although with a modern truck.

    What is the towed to self-propelled ratio?

    • Towed artillery is just towed artillery, it is not “vehicle” per se, and is not “armoured” either. So I did not include it in my proposal. Though I might do a proposal for it as well someday, now that you mention it.

  4. Medium self-propelled howitzer

    This vehicle will be of an armored, turreted design with a howitzer mounted on the body of a light tank. […] with total weight of no more than 50 tons.

    How do you place 50 tons on a light tank body of 20 tons class?

    Also, see this: a modular truck by the name of Ovik Cameleon, based on IVECO Daily body.
    http://www.ovik-crossway.com/ovik-vehicle9.php
    http://www.cameleon-mms.com/military/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OVIK_Cameleon_IV440_Modular_Mission_Vehicle

  5. I’d advise looking into getting a fuel trailer as well, especially for the tanks advancing rapidly.

  6. Come to think of it, how would the flamethrower tank look?

    Flamethrower tank

    This vehicle will be based on tank chassis. This configuration would have a flamethrower but also retain the main gun as flamethrower would be mounted in the body of a tank. Fuel for the flamethrower would be towed in a separate jettisonable trailer, so that it would be able to continue in standard tank role once flamethrower fuel is spent, and crew would be protected if the fuel caught fire. Main gun would also have a selection of thermobaric projectiles. It will be deployed in heavy, medium and light variants.

    Something like this:

    With this?

  7. I know some time has passed since you have posted this but I still want to ask about few things. Please don’t consider these as criticism.
    1- Why would any army would need more than one class of tanks? In WW2 it is proven that light tanks aren’t effective combatants compared to medium tanks. Also world saw that heavy tanks are useless because of their logistical needs and poor mobility. This is why we have MBTs. They are direct descendants of medium tanks. A lighter amphibious tank can be usefull (if there is a possibility amphibious assault) but there is no need for seperate medium and heavy tanks. I think 70 tons is too heavy and 45 tons is too light for a modern MBT.
    2- I wonder why this hypothetical army would need dedicated assault guns when it already has mortar carriers, man mobile mortars, shoulder fired weapons, grenade launchers, tanks and ifvs.
    3- Flame throwers are useless. They easily give away their location, dangerous to carry and short ranged. Thermobarics have none of these problems. Flame tank should be a vehicle armed with 6 to 8 recoilless guns using thermobarics.
    Something like this but bigger and much more armored https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M50_Ontos
    4- Rocket artilery took the position of large caliber gun artilery. US tried using 175mm self propelled guns but it wasn’t satisfying. What reason would justify having 250+ mm guns?

    And having white phosphorus rockets would spend a lot of public relations capital.

    • “1- Why would any army would need more than one class of tanks? In WW2 it is proven that light tanks aren’t effective combatants compared to medium tanks. Also world saw that heavy tanks are useless because of their logistical needs and poor mobility. This is why we have MBTs. They are direct descendants of medium tanks. A lighter amphibious tank can be usefull (if there is a possibility amphibious assault) but there is no need for seperate medium and heavy tanks. I think 70 tons is too heavy and 45 tons is too light for a modern MBT.”

      Not really. Light tanks of World War II were not intended for combat in the first place, they were there to act as scouts and to destroy enemy soft-skinned vehicles such as supply trucks behind enemy lines, and were very effective at that. There is also the fact that US tank destroyers of World War II were very much light tanks in all but name (light armour, fast, turreted gun), and were – as name implies – used primarily for destroying enemy tanks. Modern armies still deploy tank destroyers but these tend to be wheeled vehicles, which harms their cross-country mobility. Light tanks that I outlined are intended to cover all these issues.

      As for MBTs, different countries have different weight classes depending on their tank doctrine as well as the terrain they are supposed to fight in. Russian and French designs prioritize mobility, meaning that their MBTs are typically in 40-50 ton class (especially Russian ones). British prioritize protection, so their MBTs are in 60-70 ton class. German and American MBTs are also 60-70 ton class, and they prioritize firepower over both protection and mobility. So basically there still are medium and heavy tanks, except they are all covered by the MBT moniker.

      “2- I wonder why this hypothetical army would need dedicated assault guns when it already has mortar carriers, man mobile mortars, shoulder fired weapons, grenade launchers, tanks and ifvs.”

      Because assault guns are assault guns. They are designed to provide heavy firepower in a relatively small package. Mortars are intended for indirect fire, and due to their design, exit velocity and typically indirect-fire role, they are not good in destroying enemy bunkers, particularly ones that are dug in. Man mobile mortars have the same issues, plus they can be supressed by small-arms fire. Shoulder fired weapons also can be supressed by small-arms fire, and reduce mobility of squads equipped with them. Grenade launchers are not good against armour. As for tanks and IFVs, fact that they are turreted means that they are very limited in terms of gun calibre and recoil, limiting their firepower. They also tend to be taller and heavier, meaning that they are both easier to hit and less protected for weight.

      “3- Flame throwers are useless. They easily give away their location, dangerous to carry and short ranged. Thermobarics have none of these problems. Flame tank should be a vehicle armed with 6 to 8 recoilless guns using thermobarics.
      Something like this but bigger and much more armored https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M50_Ontos

      I agree with most of it, however when you are fighting inside a city, short range is not really a problem, and hiding tank in a city is a high fantasy at best. If you are in position to shoot at the enemy, chances are he has already noticed you (unless you are shooting straight through the building). Reason why I chose flamethrowers in addition to thermobarics is that flamethrowers shoot liquid. Thermobaric projectile may not be able to pass through the gun port of a bunker, liquid stream has no such problems.

      “4- Rocket artilery took the position of large caliber gun artilery. US tried using 175mm self propelled guns but it wasn’t satisfying. What reason would justify having 250+ mm guns?”

      Equipping large calibre guns with rocket or base bleed projectile ammunition can allow for range rivalling or surpassing that of rocket artillery while reducing logistics trail due to far smaller volume of these projectiles compared to rockets. There is also the fact that such projectiles are far more precise than rockets due to smaller side area leading to lessened susceptibility to wind, meaning that not only individual projectiles are smaller but you also need less of them to destroy the target.

      “And having white phosphorus rockets would spend a lot of public relations capital.”

      IIRC, WP rockets are used (among other things) for marking targets to Close Air Support element, and White Phosphorus is the most effective smoke producing agent. And if using de-facto chemical weapons (Depleted Uranium) is not a problem, why would White Phosphorus be? That being said, red phosphorus may be a better choice.

    • I had just finished “Armoured vehicle utilization” post, which explains my idea for utilization, and reasoning behind, the vehicles outlined here. It will be posted on 16th of next month, which is to say in 23 days.

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