Fast food industry – a threat for national security

While people talk about US national security, health care and funds for these, they usually ignore impact that food industry and health education have on them. Yet this impact is large: in 2010, 37,5% of all US adults were obese, and thus illegible for military service. In fact, 23,3% of all applicants are disqualified for being obese. And while US military as-is does not have problem with meeting quota due to unemployment, obesity does impair country’s ability to defend itself. Furthermore, it harms economy, and causes whole new set of expenses to fall on taxpayers. And it is predicted that by 2030, 42% of Americans will be obese.

This report shows that Medicare per-capita spending for obese person is 1.429 USD per year above that for non-obese person in 2010 USD, which translates into 1.535 USD in 2012. This translates into per-year expenditure of 56,8 billion USD just for treating obesity. At least 7 billion USD of that figure is spent on drugs. Just military health insurance system (TRICARE) pays 1,1 billion USD each year for obesity-related health care – which is around half of its annual budget.

190,5 billion USD are spent annually to treat diabetes. While obesity is not the sole cause of diabetes, 30,9% of people with diabetes are either overweight or obese, with obese accounting for 21,1% and overweight 9,8%. As such, obesity could account for up to 30 billion USD of the figure.

Obesity is a problem also because obese people (and, as I have shown before, 35,3% of military-aged males are obese) are not fit for military service. Thus a pool of people from whom military can recruit in need is reduced. In fact, US generals have called junk food a “national security threat”.

It isn’t only US problem. In South Europe, traditional Mediterranean diet of fresh fruit, fish, vegetables and olive oil – one of healthiest in the world – is disappearing under the relentless onslaught of fast food. In European countries, between 10 and 30% of adults were obese. Probably unsurprisingly, Scandinavian and South European countries fared better than others so far, but how long will it last?

So, what can be done about it?

One of main reasons fast food is popular is because it is cheap (not so much in Croatia, but still far cheaper than fish for example). That is a problem, since neoliberal policies have created a large number of very poor and small number of very rich people, with middle class slowly but surely disappearing from US social scene.

Second reason is that it is readily avaliable. In Europe, it is just as easy to find fast food restaurant or pizzeria than a bakery or small shop – in United States, it is probably far easier. Worse, it is found in or near the educational institutions, such as schools and faculties, breeding bad eating habits from early age – literally creating children addicts.

Third, parents are twice as likely to buy fast food if it was advertised by a celebrity. In fact, fast food companies pay 1 million USD per celebrity. As such, sport and other (super)stars should be banned from advertising fast food. In fact, more than half of kids try particular fast food after they have seen it being advertised, with fifth doing it because it was advertised by a celebrity. Just as worryingly, fast food companies specifically target children, in order to make fast food addicts out of them.

Fourth, fast food is filled with aditives, most of which are designed to do what their name suggests – create a chemical addiction (not unlike heroine or cocaine) to a certain food.

Fifth, and probably most important, traditional family is being broken down. If both parents are forced to spend entire day working, they do not have time to prepare healthy meals, and as such have to turn to readily-avaliable food: fast food and sweets. Since shaping of basic habits – eating habits, work habits etc. – is done at young age, lack of parental care often results in unhealthy eating habits. In traditional family, grandparents would have taken care of the child; but already-mentioned breakdown of traditional family means that they are often not around to do it, and fast food provides a cheap and easy solution.

Further, many schools have banned carrying food from home – replacing it instead with food that “reaches nutritional standards”. Such food, in most cases, lacks basic nutritients and is outright dangerous (chicken nuggets being an example). Other schools, due to the lack of funding, have to prepare fast food.

What this means for the Western militaries is that their pool of recruits is likely to get even smaller in the future, and funds harder to get by as health care expenses rise. And while US military has so large budget it is literally drowning itself in money, health education is almost nonexistent.

Also, it has been suggested that fast food reduces intelligence, by around 2 points – and even if it does not, US Appleton school has proven that low-fat, low-sugar food based around whole greens, fresh fruits, vegetables and no beef, as well as no baking, improves performance in school because children find it easier to focus. As such, military’s pool of highly qualified recruits is going to get ever lower.

It must be understood that preventing problem is both far cheaper and far more effective than solving it afterwards. Thus, fast food problem cannot be ignored. It does not represent only a social risk – it is a serious security risk for any country, and has to be dealt with accordingly. Unfortunately, fast food companies’ lobbysts have, as did defense industry lobbysts on issue of ineffective weapons, made sure there will be no major changes. These lobbysts have friends in US conservative political scene, according to which Government should only provide for defense. However, that is illogical – Government’s business is to take care of the state, which involves handling all security threats – including fast food industry. And while US are making moves to combat obesity, conservatives are mocking these moves, clearly showing that they do not care about US national security, but only about corporate accounts. Addict has to have a professional help to recover. Kid must be taught how to choose right food – and it must be given a choice.

But it must be done in correct way. For exaple, while Coca-Cola with its high sugary content certainly isn’t good for health, Diet Cola is far worse, replacing mostly natural composition of original Coca-Cola with artificial ingridients.

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18 replies

  1. This is kind of like the military and technology. The military is in love with technology, especially the ineffective stuff. It has become this way because the US has a technology advantage over it’s likely opponents. Fast food has provided calorically dense food, but has little nutritional value. However, it is widely available and very addictive. Chicken nuggets by the way, if only the public knew. They are about half corn starch, and half emulsified meats (which more or less has little nutrients). They also have a lot of artificial flavors, (the natural flavoring having been lost somewhat in the processing).

    I was recently in the US (I live in Canada). Anyways, McDonald’s Dollar Menu is exactly that – for just $1 USD, you can 1 of any of these:
    http://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/food/meal_bundles/dollar_menu.html

    (That’s about 5.65 kuna). It’s a situation where well, it has become cheaper for many families to eat at McDonald’s than it is to cook at home. I don’t know if you are living in Croatia or the US.

    It’s more expensive here in Canada and we’ve got better recreational facilities in general, but obesity has become a problem everywhere.

    • I am living in Croatia, but yes, fast food is cheap – dangerously so, I’d say. You may not have money to buy any actual food, but you’d likely have enough to buy few bags of chips.

      • What’s alarming about all of this is that well, it seems that the practices of the MICC have in many ways been exported to the rest of the economy. One no longer makes money by making a superior product. It would be one thing if these hyper expensive weapons delivered capabilities proportionate to their cost. They do not. They are present because well, the military and the defense industry has entrenched them.

        Similarly with the food industry, it has managed to entrench itself. People are addicted. This is like tobacco or alcohol. The food industry now has massive political influence in many nations. Despite the well documented costs to health, their availability, combined with a very aggressive marketing strategy have managed to see very rapid proliferation around the world. It would be one thing if fast food offered products of equal or superior nutritional value to the foods that they replaced (home cooked meals), but they don’t.

        It seems that things that otherwise seem good often have a double edged sword. Technology has led to an over-reliance of it, to the detriment of everything else in the military. Fast food offers convenience for foods that are aggressively priced and have been designed to taste good. Nobody forced any military to build the types of super-complex systems that exist today. They happened. Similarly, in many cases, people have a choice between eating at home versus eating out. A lot of people choose to eat out. This of course also draws attention to yet another issue – the failure of our society to ensure that affordable and nutritious foods are provided to economically disadvantaged people.

        What we need is a great correction. A correction of the neoliberal economic policies and the domination of the military industrial complex.

      • It is not that practices of MICC have exported to the rest of the economy, such practices existed before (and indeed caused) The Great Depression of the 1930s. It is simply that wild capitalism has returned, and is equally poisoning all parts of the society. Until the next big crash (followed by a world war, possibly), that is.

        And problem with science and industry in general is well studied in Michael Chricton’s “Jurassic Park”. As Malcolm puts it, “Science can make a nuclear reactor, but it cannot tell us not to build it. Science can make pesticide, but cannot tell us not to use it.” Actually, some branches of science can tell you very well wether you should do X – history, primarly, but also some other social sciences – but apparently some people don’t believe it is a science unless you can do predictions with formulae. Which itself is impossible whenever there is a human factor involved. Take a look at behavior of many stealth advocates: they point out that radar-guided BVR missiles had excellent performance in both Gulf Wars (which is true), and then assert that it is solely due to the technology, and that Iraqi incompetence was irrelevant (which is false). But all great military thinkers, strategists and tacticians – Sun Tzu, Julius Caesar, Friedrich the Great, von Clausewitz, John Boyd – recognized the decisive importance of human factor.

        This is my favorite J.P. quote:
        “In the information society, nobody thinks. We expected to banish paper, but we actually banished thought.”
        ― Michael Crichton
        So much true, especially with modern decision-makers, military and civillian alike.

        “Living systems are never in equilibrium. They are inherently unstable. They may seem stable, but they’re not. Everything is moving and changing. In a sense, everything is on the edge of collapse.”
        ― Michael Crichton, Jurassic Park
        – which is what Boyd always cautioned; living systems adapt, dead ones do not. Therefore you cannot rely on technology to carry the day by itself, and simpler some technology is, more adaptable it is. And since it is human characteristic to adapt, but not characteristic of technology by itself, side using less complex technology and solutions has the advantage (this should not be extrapolated to extremes).

        Another quote applicable to modern usage of, and overreliance on, technology:
        Malcolm: A karate master does not kill people with his bare hands. He does not lose his temper and kill his wife. The person who kills is the person who has no discipline, no restraint, and who has purchased his power in the form of a Saturday night special. And that is why you think that to build a place like this is simple.
        Malcolm: “They don’t have intelligence. They have what I call ‘thintelligence.’ They see the immediate situation. They think narrowly and they call it ‘being focused.’ They don’t see the surround. They don’t see the consequences.” – I guess that Boyd would rather agree with this assessment, it is as if Malcolm knew Western military bureocrats

        “Life will find a way.”
        ― Michael Crichton, Jurassic Park
        Life will, but technology won’t. Technology is a tool, not a purpose.

        “They believed that prediction was just a function of keeping track of things. If you knew enough, you could predict anything. That’s been cherished scientific belief since Newton.’
        And?’
        Chaos theory throws it right out the window.”
        – chaos, but also human factor.

      • “It is not that practices of MICC have exported to the rest of the economy, such practices existed before (and indeed caused) The Great Depression of the 1930s. It is simply that wild capitalism has returned, and is equally poisoning all parts of the society. Until the next big crash (followed by a world war, possibly), that is.”

        Well, I mean historically, humanity has been run in a manner with a small elite at the top at the expense of the majority beneath them. That has not changed, although the emergence of the middle class did temporarily change it. But alas, wild capitalism is killing that too.

        I suppose in a way it could be argued that the MICC is perhaps the most alarming example.

        I think as a society, we no longer value independent, critical thinking (assuming we ever did). It seems that only a few people throughout history have ever done so. There seems to also be an excessive focus on the quantitative rather than a balance between qualitative and the numbers, so to speak.

        “Take a look at behavior of many stealth advocates: they point out that radar-guided BVR missiles had excellent performance in both Gulf Wars (which is true), and then assert that it is solely due to the technology, and that Iraqi incompetence was irrelevant (which is false).”

        Yes, there is a tendency to overvalue technology.

        A lot of people in the US have noted that the irony is that the US has been falling behind on science and infrastructure relative to other nations. I mean one of the reasons why the rest of the world has caught up is because there’s a greater value placed on education (which is more affordable), more emphasis on building infrastructure, and more research (in the civilian world).

        Some hope for a “Sputnik” moment when someone overtakes the US and then they realize that America’s leadership in this area is no more, which spurs the nation. I am skeptical. The 2008 Financial Crisis highlighted the failures of neoliberal economics, yet no reforms were undertaken.

        I suspect that if the US were to face a competent opponent, and face a defeat, the MICC would stay intact. Witness the results of Vietnam, a slew of the Cold War “small wars”, and more recently the failures of Iraq (and increasingly Afghanistan). The MICC stays intact. It will likely stay intact until the fiscal reality forces change.

        “They don’t have intelligence. They have what I call ‘thintelligence.’ They see the immediate situation. They think narrowly and they call it ‘being focused.’ They don’t see the surround. They don’t see the consequences.”

        Yes that’s the flaw of modern business as well. Excessive focus on short term results at the expense of long term gains. Humans are very bad it seems at long term thinking.

        I’ve noticed that the Eastern cultures (I am of Chinese origin) tend to have a more long term orientation than people in the West. The East certainly has it’s own share of flaws, but this is not one of them. Equally noteworthy are the Aboriginal or Indian peoples – I believe one of them once said that they must consider the next 7 generations when making a big decision.

        ““They believed that prediction was just a function of keeping track of things. If you knew enough, you could predict anything. That’s been cherished scientific belief since Newton.’”

        It’s not like that all. Indeed, it would violate the laws of thermodynamics for things to become more orderly.

      • “The 2008 Financial Crisis highlighted the failures of neoliberal economics, yet no reforms were undertaken.”

        That is because the ruling class is very well off as-is and has no incentive to change things.

        “I suspect that if the US were to face a competent opponent, and face a defeat, the MICC would stay intact. Witness the results of Vietnam, a slew of the Cold War “small wars”, and more recently the failures of Iraq (and increasingly Afghanistan). The MICC stays intact. It will likely stay intact until the fiscal reality forces change.”

        Correct. To be fair, Vietnam war did cause a temporary improvement by causing procurement of the F-16, F-18 and A-10. Without Vietnam war, these aircraft would never have gotten built.

        “Humans are very bad it seems at long term thinking.”

        Long term thinking and long term memory. How else to explain that in both US and Croatia, and it seems also in UK, Germany and most other European countries, there are only two political parties which constantly replace each other despite differing in rhetoric only?

        “I’ve noticed that the Eastern cultures (I am of Chinese origin) tend to have a more long term orientation than people in the West. The East certainly has it’s own share of flaws, but this is not one of them.”

        That is because Eastern cultures are more socially-oriented. I remember reading that, during relatively recent crisis (in 1990s or early 2000s, I think) caused by neoliberalism, some older people in Japan and Korea killed themselves to ease the burden on their children, and when call came, everyone gladly gave up whatever gold they had to help their country. I have a hard time imagining something like that happening in the West. Interestingly, more individualism got promoted in the West, people started to act more and more like a herd of sheep on cocaine.

        “It’s not like that all. Indeed, it would violate the laws of thermodynamics for things to become more orderly.”

        It’s just a quote from book, and regardless of Newton, it does hold true for US MICC. They always ignored past lessons and predicted that technology will function well in the next war. But unorderly nature of actual warfare always caused that belief wrong.

      • “That is because the ruling class is very well off as-is and has no incentive to change things.”

        Barring the threat of something like the French Revolution, I suspect that it may stay that way.

        “I remember reading that, during relatively recent crisis (in 1990s or early 2000s, I think) caused by neoliberalism, some older people in Japan and Korea killed themselves to ease the burden on their children, and when call came, everyone gladly gave up whatever gold they had to help their country.

        That is correct, at least in Japan. They have an insurance system that kind of incentives that. There is also no reliable source of credit for individuals. Suicide is a rational course of action for such a person to protect their families. That said, the high suicide rates in Japan and South Korea are caused by some of the social issues there.

        “I have a hard time imagining something like that happening in the West. ”

        I think that the last time that sort of collective will to unify (or something close to it), happened was WWII. There was a mentality of the idea that everyone was in it together. It was certainly not perfect and there were actions that were less than admirable (ex: strategic bombing, the internment of people of Japanese origin, etc), but there was a greater level of national unity. For the Anglo-Saxon nations, apart from the UK, the postwar period into the 1950s and 1960s was an economic boom. Even the UK saw a steady improvement in living standards.

        I mean that said, there has been improvements in other areas. Racial tolerance for example has gone up. Tolerance of minority groups, unique cultures, and people who were once viewed with suspicion for no reason other than being different too has gone up.

        “They always ignored past lessons and predicted that technology will function well in the next war. But unorderly nature of actual warfare always caused that belief wrong.”

        If history is any guide, it’s that the MICC will do too little, too late, and only then resisting every trend. The MICC is trying to fight a fourth generation era of warfare with what amounts to a second generation mentality. I suspect that even after the magnitude of the damage becomes apparent, there will still be strong resistance to any reform. Observations:

        1. Strength is often measured in firepower or in technology relative to the enemy. Strength is also heavily defined in the case of the US by the growth in the defense budget. Even small cuts cause a political storm.

        2. Moral warfare is often ignored. I mean, the DoD does give buzzword to “troop morale” and other things, acknowledging their importance, but at the same time, it’s not followed with real action. The mainstream media in the US is more or less a Pravda-like mouthpiece. In that regard, moral warfare is noted, but as wars drag on, even the press has been a bit critical. The high rate of suicide in the US armed forces is indicative that something is very wrong.

        3. The types of weapons are not tailored to the enemy. Instead, the most profitable weapons for the defense industry are procured and a justification comes up after that.

        4. Bureaucracy is a serious problem. Any real changes require a cultural change and the current regime is entrenched. That and it prevents rapid action. Command structures are overly centralized too. Anything that changes has to move up the command chain before it gets done.

        5. One thing that I have noticed is that the “conventional wisdom” in most Western armed forces is that they are well suited to “conventional warfare” (which namely means a Third Generation army using weapons and tactics similar to them), but is unsuited for facing non-state actors.

        I question that wisdom. Against a competent enemy that executed Third Generation Warfare well with very competent troops and leadership, my bet is that a typical Western army would not fare well. Granted, there would be a few exceptional individuals, but as an organization, the vast majority would not do very well.

        I think that Western civilization has lost it’s capacity for self-reflection.

        6. Careerism is rampant in many armies. People are not interested anymore in accomplishing, but holding rank. This in turn, causes conformity in the hopes of higher rank. The ones that make it to the higher ranks can look forward to a high paying job in the defense industry.

        “Correct. To be fair, Vietnam war did cause a temporary improvement by causing procurement of the F-16, F-18 and A-10. Without Vietnam war, these aircraft would never have gotten built.”

        I suspect that had their not been a group of people like the Fighter Mafia, what would have happened is a bigger and heavier F-111. There’s nothing with the power and influence like that today. Hence, we get the F-35, the LCS, and plans to spend $500 billion over the next couple of decades on a stealth bomber to replace the B52.

      • “I think that the last time that sort of collective will to unify (or something close to it), happened was WWII. (…)”

        Agreed.

        “If history is any guide, it’s that the MICC will do too little, too late, and only then resisting every trend. The MICC is trying to fight a fourth generation era of warfare with what amounts to a second generation mentality. I suspect that even after the magnitude of the damage becomes apparent, there will still be strong resistance to any reform.”

        That’s the core of it.

        “1. Strength is often measured in firepower or in technology relative to the enemy. Strength is also heavily defined in the case of the US by the growth in the defense budget. Even small cuts cause a political storm.”

        That is the common failling, but even short examination of history shows how faulty it is. If strength really was determined by the budget, Germany would not have defeated UK and France in World War II, US would not have lost the Vietnam war…

        “2. Moral warfare is often ignored.”

        Propaganda is not, but agressive warfare will always lead to people questioning it, and US defense establishment itself not only ignores human factor, but wants to get rid of it.

        “3. The types of weapons are not tailored to the enemy. Instead, the most profitable weapons for the defense industry are procured and a justification comes up after that.”

        Agreed, and it is nothing new. P-47, P-38, F-104, F-105, F-111, F-15, F-22, F-35… each of these was designed to be as profitable as possible, and each has performed worse than cheaper alternatives. And in fact, F-22 and F-35 excepted, more expensive of fighters listed have always performed worse than less expensive aircraft listed (P-38 vs P-47, F-105 vs F-104).

        “Bureaucracy is a serious problem. Any real changes require a cultural change and the current regime is entrenched. That and it prevents rapid action. Command structures are overly centralized too. Anything that changes has to move up the command chain before it gets done.”

        Centralization destroyed Royal Navy, it is destroying USAF too. Read America’s Defense Meltdown, you may be able to find it on net.

        “One thing that I have noticed is that the “conventional wisdom” in most Western armed forces is that they are well suited to “conventional warfare” (which namely means a Third Generation army using weapons and tactics similar to them), but is unsuited for facing non-state actors.”

        Question is how well suited they are for conventional warfare either. Complexity reduces reliability and increases cost, neither of which is good for warfighting. Ref. US and NATO running out of PGMs in Bosnia in 1990s or during Libya campaign.

        “Careerism is rampant in many armies. People are not interested anymore in accomplishing, but holding rank. This in turn, causes conformity in the hopes of higher rank. The ones that make it to the higher ranks can look forward to a high paying job in the defense industry.”

        That is a well-known problem in the United States, and I suspect not only there.

        “I suspect that had their not been a group of people like the Fighter Mafia, what would have happened is a bigger and heavier F-111. There’s nothing with the power and influence like that today.”

        Agreed.

      • “That is the common failling, but even short examination of history shows how faulty it is. If strength really was determined by the budget, Germany would not have defeated UK and France in World War II, US would not have lost the Vietnam war…”

        One reason why they do not measure this is because it’s hard to quantify at times and relies on subjective intelligence. But more important, the real reason why they do not is because it would very quickly lead to implications: namely that the human factor is key, and that the current system (namely the one highly profitable for the MICC) is deeply flawed.

        “Propaganda is not, but agressive warfare will always lead to people questioning it, and US defense establishment itself not only ignores human factor, but wants to get rid of it.”

        Which is of course not possible. People fight wars. The human factor will always be there. Even in the age of drones and robots.

        That and it could be argued that the entire premise of the War on Terror that the US is waging is highly flawed, a waste of money, and worse, will worsen security for the world. But of course that is not profitable for the MICC.

        “Centralization destroyed Royal Navy, it is destroying USAF too. Read America’s Defense Meltdown, you may be able to find it on net.”

        Yeah I did read the book, along with the Pentagon Labyrinth. I agree with the majority of the books’ points and I think that a fundamental reform is needed, seeing as the world’s economy no longer has money to spend (or waste) in the current defense system.

        I think centralization is affecting all armies in the Western World, and many outside of the Western world.

        “Question is how well suited they are for conventional warfare either. Complexity reduces reliability and increases cost, neither of which is good for warfighting. Ref. US and NATO running out of PGMs in Bosnia in 1990s or during Libya campaign.”

        To which I replied
        “I question that wisdom. Against a competent enemy that executed Third Generation Warfare well with very competent troops and leadership, my bet is that a typical Western army would not fare well. Granted, there would be a few exceptional individuals, but as an organization, the vast majority would not do very well. ”

        Historically though, ammunition consumption has always been several times that of predicted. I believe someone once analyzed (I will attempt to find the link later), and found that typical ammunition consumption was 5 times that of initial expectations.

        Of course, this is more an issue of poor forecasting than anything else.

      • “But more important, the real reason why they do not is because it would very quickly lead to implications: namely that the human factor is key, and that the current system (namely the one highly profitable for the MICC) is deeply flawed.”

        Yes, that is the reason. But it might also be psychological, bureocrats don’t like abstractions and anything connected to human behavior is something that cannot be defined by numbers. “More money = better defense” is simply a formula that bureocrats use to avoid dealing with human factor, and as MICC thrives thanks to it, we come to a mutually-reinforcing pact of lazyness, stupidity and greed.

        “Which is of course not possible. People fight wars. The human factor will always be there. Even in the age of drones and robots.

        That and it could be argued that the entire premise of the War on Terror that the US is waging is highly flawed, a waste of money, and worse, will worsen security for the world. But of course that is not profitable for the MICC.”

        Agreed.

        “Of course, this is more an issue of poor forecasting than anything else.”

        It is an issue of overestimating weapons’ capability, such as “one target, one PGM” propaganda touted by Western militaries (which is far from true for even fixed targets, and against mobile targets you might end up spending a dozen or so PGMs to little or no effect). Which itself is partly intentional.

  2. Well here’s the good news. At least 40% of the population is losing weight or has lost weight..

  3. I loved studying this, have you been on myspace? vivianlowery.

  4. There’s other scary stuff going on right now in the US:

    Apparently, people think they can medicate their kids to focus in school.

  5. There are other issues. Some are amusing. A school district is buying an 18 ton armored truck, (the anti-mine ones used in Iraq).

    http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/a-school-district-bought-an-18-ton-mrap-because-the-wor-1634810604/all

    The militarization of police and now schools has gotten out of hand. On a less amusing note, in response to the high rates of gun violence in the US, they’ve started arming school teachers with guns.

    http://www.texasmonthly.com/story/rise-armed-teachers?fullpage=1
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/23/missouri-teachers-concealed-weapons_n_5522708.html

    Another interesting article:
    http://www.theguardian.com/money/2014/aug/17/police-guns-detroit-crime-race-cost-issues

    Kind of scary the direction the US is going.

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