Defense Issues

Military and general security

The 2016 DOT&E Report on the F-35 – David Archibald

Posted by picard578 on January 14, 2017

The role of the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation at the Pentagon is to ensure that US weapons programs continue on track and that the weapons do what they are supposed to. His report for the 2016 year can be found here. The interesting observations in the report, with respect to the F-35, are listed following: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in weapons | Tagged: , , , | 14 Comments »

Hollowpoint bullets

Posted by picard578 on January 11, 2017

Hollowpoint bullets have been a very controversial topic for nearly two decades now. They have often been the focal point of the anti-gun campaign, despite not being anything new. Hollowpoint ammunition has appeared near the end of the 19th century, a time from which also dates the common nickname – “dum-dum bullets”, which came from the town of Dum Dum in India (near Calcutta), where British produced ammunition for rifles in .303 caliber. (It should be noted that actual “dum-dum” bullets were not hollowpoints, but rather soft-nosed projectiles, with flat nose exposing the lead core through the lubaloy jacket). For various reasons, including international bans, hollowpoint ammunition never found widespread usage in the military. However, it became very popular for hunters and in self-defense. There is an interesting anecdote about Winston Churchill, who was an officer in the Boer War. In his Mauser C-96, Churchill carried self-made hollowpoint ammunition. Boers would have executed him for utilising such ammunition, but he managed to escape.

Hollowpoint bullet usage started to get more widespread after 1960., when Lee Juras developed hollowpoint bullets of small mass and high exit velocity. With that, he solved the issue of reliable expansion. As the reliability rose, so did the usage of hollowpoint bullets among both police and the civillians. Consequence of that was also increased interest of the media and general public in hollowpoint bullets, who quickly – and incorrectly – identified hollowpoint ammunition as a threat to the society. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in weapons | Tagged: , , , | 6 Comments »

Czech Republic has the right idea

Posted by picard578 on January 10, 2017

Czechs are smarter than the brainwashed Western Europe. Groups of apes have always been killing each others and this has not changed when apes evolved into humans. That is why multiculturalism does not work. And Islam is the ultimate war ideology, one which encourages its followers to kill everybody else. So Europe has to prepare for war for its very survival.

aussieconservativeblog

In contrast to the failures of Western Europe, the Czech Republic still has some good sense, in speaking candidly about how to deal with the Islamist threat.

“Czech government tells its citizens how to fight terrorists: Shoot them yourselves”, Washington Post, January 5, 2016:

A couple of months ago, Czech President Milos Zeman made an unusual request: He urged citizens to arm themselves against a possible “super-Holocaust” carried out by Muslim terrorists.
Never mind that there are fewer than 4,000 Muslims in this country of 10 million people — gun purchases spiked. One shop owner in East Bohemia, a region in the northern center of the Czech Republic, told a local paper that people were scared of a “wave of Islamists.”
Now the country’s interior ministry is pushing a constitutional change that would let citizens use guns against terrorists. Proponents say this could save lives if an attack occurs…

View original post 99 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

How the Crusades Saved Europe

Posted by picard578 on January 7, 2017

Crusades saved Europe from being conquered by the most lethal ideology in history – Islam. Unlike islamic jihad, Crusades were not offensive wars of conquest, nor they were religious extremism or fanaticism. They were a defensive response to a life-threatening situation.

swissdefenceleague

How the Crusades Saved Europe

The Battle of Vienna, September Eleven 1683 (movie)

View original post

Posted in Uncategorized | 12 Comments »

Revolver or pistol

Posted by picard578 on January 1, 2017

revolver-or-semi-automatic

Introduction

For a hundred years now, there has been discussion between those who favour revolvers and those who favour pistols. While handguns have not been a major factor in wars to this date, psychological effect of possesing one should not be underestimated. In the last half a century, there have been no revolutionary developments in design and construction of either pistols or revolvers, so this thematic did not receive major attention.

Pistols can be non-automatic, where both reloading of the bullet and firing is done manually; half-automatic, where reloading is automatic but trigger has to be pulled for each firing; or fully automatic, where both reloading and the firing are done automatically as long as the trigger is kept pressed. Modern pistols are either half-automatic or fully automatic, with automatic pistols having the possibility of selecting either half-automatic or fully automatic operation. Some automatic pistols are equipped with gun-stocks in order to increase effective range of fire, from up to 50 to up to 200 meters. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in weapons | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

TRUMPED BY TRUTH

Posted by picard578 on December 23, 2016

Patrice Ayme's Thoughts

Trump is the just deserts Obama deserved. It’s bitter sweet, for me. Truth has compelled me, over the years, to say rather unpleasant things about Obama’s deplorable reign. The reign of “cool” was a new wave hubris..

Trump, unwittingly parroting me, said that Obama “maybe the worst president the USA” ever knew. I said this years ago. It was not quite true. I was trying to wake Obama up. Actually Bill Clinton was worse.

It was bitter to say such nasty things, however supported by the veracity of graphs they were, because I used to have so much hope in Obama. And he squandered his presidency away, due to his youth, lack of experience, lack of ferocity, and lack of heroism (to put it mildly). Obama is smart: his words sound often like those I would proferr. However he ruled as a roi fainéant (a French notion which…

View original post 169 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

Open anti- white sentiment

Posted by picard578 on December 22, 2016

Everyone can hear about conservative anti-black racism, anti-Muslim racism (even though Islam is a political ideology, not a race), but anti-white racism is fairly extant and strong, particularly in progressive circles, yet it is hardly ever talked about.

aussieconservativeblog

In this era of tolerance, the only group that can be acceptably be ridiculed, criticized and mocked based on racial origins, are white people.

Routinely, the customs and norms of white people are openly derided in public spheres, while minorities remain sacred cows.

Any criticism of minority ethnic groups is instantly regarded as racist, while the taunts aimed at white people are seldom taken seriously.

In fact, being a white, heterosexual male, means that you have no noted victim card to call upon in political debate. It is also difficult if not impossible, for a person to be racist, bigoted or hateful in their behaviour towards you.

Am I saying that white people are some sort of persecuted minority? No.

Am I saying that the historic maltreatment of ethnic minorities was insignificant? No.

Or am I arguing that the slurs directed towards white people should be disallowed by law? No.

But in a time in…

View original post 68 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

On Vatican and science – the myth of Catholic irrationality

Posted by picard578 on December 21, 2016

Vatican is often seen in a popular belief as being anti-science, in a typical dichotomy of faith and science. Yet faith is not necessarily against science, and science itself requires faith (in people, scientists, scientific process, etc.). While some Christians are indeed against science, and there are religions that are extremely hostile to science, neither Christianity as such nor Vatican were inherently against science. Vatican in particular always had an attitude of “God can do anything, so anything is possible”. And this, as crazy as it sounds, includes alien life. In fact, the idea that God had created an orderly world gave rise to science (even in polytheistic religions, so that is not exclusive to monotheistic religions). If God had created the world, He made laws, and humans are duty-bound to understand those laws so they could fully live as the God commands. If the world is not intelligible and orderly, there is no point in trying to understand the laws because there are no laws. Romans and Greeks did not develop modern science because the world was at whims of a bunch of rabid gods, so studying natural laws made no sense; Islam today presents the same problem, except with one god instead of many. Church infallibility only ever applied to official teachings of faith and morals; it never applied to “wordly” matters such as science. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | 16 Comments »

A-10 Thunderbolt survivability design

Posted by picard578 on December 11, 2016

When the A-10 was about to be introduced, USAF leadership used the exact same arguments to prevent that as they are using now in an effort to kill it. They saw merely a clunker that flew at 300 knots or less, an anachronistic dud unfit to operate on the modern battlefield where it was to kill Russian tanks. In fact, the A-10 would never had been introduced if the USAF was not engaged in the budgetary battle against the US Army. Army was about to introduce the new attack helicopter, the Cheyenne. Cheyenne was a compound helicopter, designed to overcome the inability of normal helicopters to achieve higher speeds when necessary, and its high price would see financial resources redirected away from the US Air Force and into the Army’s purse. USAF would have none of it, and it decided to finally take responsibility for the close air support mission it was supposed to do anyway, and so introduced the A-10. Technical requirements were outlined mainly by Pierre Sprey after talks with surviving US and German pilots who carried out close air support in World War II and the Vietnam war, while the overall effort was directed by the Colonel Avery Kay. More heavily armed, survivable and less expensive, A-10 easily killed off the Cheyenne, and the USAF never placed any orders beyond the first batch. In fact, the A-10 was the first and the last US fighter designed for close air support. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in weapons | Tagged: , , , , , , | 29 Comments »

Ground soldiers’ view of the A-10

Posted by picard578 on December 1, 2016

Introduction

Pentagon is going back and forth on its decision whether to retire the A-10 Warthog. This is due to various pressures, both internal and external. Military industry cares only about the money, and retiring the A-10 would bring huge profits to the defense contractors as the aircraft would have to be replaced – likely by several times more expensive F-35. Upper levels of the military itself are connected to the military industry with a system of revolving doors, and retired generals get highly paid jobs inside the military industry. This means that active generals are under extreme pressure to secure profitable contracts to large military corporations.

A-10 is an anthithesis of everything that technophilic industry and generals believe in. It is an embodiement of the World War II military adage, „Keep it simple, stupid“. Aircraft itself is basically a flying gun – literally, as the gun was designed first and then an aircraft was designed to carry it. It is also heavily armoured and highly maneuverable at low speeds and altitudes, and does not rely on either high speed or radar „stealth“ to keep it alive. As a result, it is a major embarassement to both the military industry and the US Air Force, both of which maintain that top-of-the-line technology is absolutely necessary for a useful weapon. It also looks ugly, unlike Mach 2 fast jets that seem perfect for PR photoshoots.

Because of this, USAF generals are very motivated to try and retire the A-10. They use half-truths, lies and promises to warp the public image of the aircraft. USAF states that fast jets such as the F-15, F-16 and F-35 can perform the close air support as well as the A-10, completely ignoring many doctrinal and technical difficulties they face: pilots that train for many missions, not just close air support, and do not understand situation on the ground; limited situational awareness when aircraft are at high altitude due to „soda-straw“ view of the sensors such as radar and FLIR; „smart“ munitions missing due to fins being bent at release, sensors or computers malfunctioning; bad weather forcing the aircraft to come within enemy weapons envelope, which fast jets cannot survive; inability to provide timely close air support due to fast jets being incapable of lotering above the troops or flying from dirt strips near the troops in contact. This betrays complete lack of interest in and understanding of the close air support mission, which is far more complex than merely dialling in the coordinates and requires a community dedicated to nothing but close air support to keep alive. More importantly, presence of a dedicated CAS aircraft forces the USAF leadership to keep the mission alive, instead of airmen who trained only for hitting strategic targets from fast jets being forced to come up with ad hoc solutions on the spot, and making mistakes – oftentimes deadly – in the process. But right now, USAF leadership is cutting maintenance to the A-10, in an attempt to artificially induce mechanical and other failures which would then be used as a „proof“ that the A-10 „has to be retired“ due to „old age“.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in weapons | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments »